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BMC Cell Biology

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Editor profiles

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Ying Lou

Ying Lou is the editor of BMC Cell Biology. She received a Ph.D. degree from Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences (SIBS), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) in molecular genetics, China. Following postdoctoral work in Brookhaven National Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, USA and later work as a project scientist in University of California Davis, USA, she joined in Molecular Plant journal as a scientific editor in 2014. From November 2014, she became an editor in BMC series journals. Her interests cover molecular genetics, cellular biology, biochemistry, metabolism and biofuel studies. Ying is based in Shanghai office.

Section Editors

Matthias Falk

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New Content ItemCell-cell contacts and adhesion

Matthias Falk, PhD is Professor for Cell Biology in the Department of Biological Sciences at Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, USA.  Dr. Falk studied biology in Germany and received his PhD from the University of Heidelberg.  In 1992 he joined the Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) in La Jolla, California as a Postdoc, was appointed to faculty in 1998, and joined Lehigh University in August 2003. 

Dr. Falk’s research investigates the biosynthesis, structure and function of gap junctions, plasma membrane channels that provide direct cell-to-cell communication and physical cell-cell adhesion.  He teaches classes and lab courses in Molecular Cell Biology on all levels.  He also tests the biocompatibility and bioactivity of dual-porous glass bone-replacement scaffolds that are manufactured at Lehigh’s “International Materials Institute for New Functionality in Glass (IMI-NFG)” headed by his collaborator, Prof. Jain. 

Dr. Falk has published numerous manuscripts in international peer-reviewed journals, has attracted extensive extramural funding, and has contributed significantly to our understanding of gap junction function in physio-/pathology.

Xuejun Jiang

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New Content ItemProtein degradation and cell death

Dr. Xuejun Jiang got his PhD degree from University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in 1999. After a postdoctoral training at the same institute, he joined Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and the graduate school of Cornell University Weill Medical College as a faculty member in 2003, and raised to the rank of full professorship in 2013.

The current research of his laboratory focuses on two directions: the molecular basis of programmed cell death and their roles in diseases; and the molecular basis of autophagy and its role in cancer. His lab also aims to translate their basic research findings into potential therapeutic approaches. To achieve these goals, the laboratory utilizes a combination of approaches including biochemistry, chemical biology, proteomics, molecular cell biology, high-throughput screening, 3-dimensional microfluidic cell array, and mouse modeling.

Dr. Jiang joined the editorial board of BMC Cell Biology in 2008.

Andrew Peden

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CNew Content Itemytoplasmic and organelle biology

Andrew Peden obtained his PhD from the University of Cambridge in 2002. He performed his postdoctoral training at Stanford University and Genentech Inc.

In 2006 he established his own group at the Cambridge Institute for Medical Research funded by a MRC Career Development Award.  In 2012 he moved his lab to the University of Sheffield in the Department of Biomedical Science.

Dr Peden’s research is focused on elucidating the cellular pathways and machinery involved in post-Golgi trafficking and constitutive secretion.

He has been an editor at BMC Cell biology since 2014.

Howard J. Worman

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New Content ItemNuclear function and transport

Howard J. Worman is Professor of Medicine and Pathology and Cell Biology at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. Dr. Worman received a BA from Cornell University and MD from the University of Chicago. He then trained in internal medicine at the New York Hospital and was a postdoctoral fellow in cell biology with Dr. Günter Blobel at Rockefeller University.

Dr. Worman’s laboratory research is focused primarily on diseases caused by mutations in genes encoding nuclear envelope proteins. He also studies fatty liver disease and antibodies in autoimmune liver diseases. In 1998, Dr. Worman was elected to membership in the American Society for Clinical Investigator and, in 2010, to the Association of American Physicians.

He joined the Editorial Board of BMC Cell Biology in 2002, served as an Associate Editor from 2008 to 2010 and has been Section Editor of the Nuclear Function and Transport section since 2010.